From Glen Coe to Skye, Scotland (Part II)

Part two picks up on a sunny day leaving Kilchurn Castle, heading north on A82 through the stunning Glen Coe en route to the Isle of Skye. Scotland was quickly climbing my list of favorite places, with some of the most majestic scenery I’ve ever seen!

Despite the amazing landscapes, Glen Coe is the scene of one of the most infamous massacres in Scottish history. In 1692 following the Jacobite uprising, 38 members of Clan MacDonald of Glencoe were killed by soldiers of clan Campbell of Argyll. Ironically, the same region I had just driven from and toured the ancestral castle in Inveraray. Nearly all of Scotland’s impressive and rugged lands are home to haunting history.

A detour from A82 down the 14 mile single track “Road to Nowhere,” Glen Etive. This was one of the most beautiful and special places I saw in Scotland. It was also a filming location for the James Bond movie, Skyfall.


The great weather allowed for a hike up to the Coire Gabhail, a hidden valley where the MacDonalds of Glen Coe once hid their cattle. The 2.5 mile trail was a bit more challenging than I expected, quite steep and rocky! But afforded some dramatic views and scenery.




It was difficult to leave this magnificent area but needed to continue on to Glenfinnan. Glenfinnan was a lovely spot for an overnight to break up the journey. Woke up early to catch the ferry from Mallaig to Skye.

Soon after arriving, I discovered I left my coat at the hotel in Glenfinnan. But after a ferry crossing, there was definitely no turning back! There are very few stores on Skye, so I settled for a thrift store jacket aptly named the Drizzler. I later discovered the Drizzler was not waterproof.


Drove out to the Trotternish Peninsula and the first stop was a hike to Brother’s Point. I’m not sure I’ve ever seen countryside so lush and green. (And I live in Oregon!) I was staying the night nearby in Flodigarry, a great location to enjoy some of Skye’s most spectacular sights.








Next up was The Old Man of Storr, an icon of the Scottish highlands. Chose to visit this spot in the early evening after the crowds had gone and it was perfect, moody timing. The weather was changing, the wind had picked up and rain was imminent.


Another icon of Skye, the Quiraing. Early in the morning, with light rain and looking absolutely magical.





Up next, the final stretch from Dornie to Torridon and then all the way east.


10 thoughts on “From Glen Coe to Skye, Scotland (Part II)

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